An Article on the Guardian Website

Yesterday evening I was alerted via Facebook that the following article had appeared on the Guardian Website:

wpid-2014-08-27-08-09-20.png

Sadly I have found that publicity regarding any of the various osseointegration techniques tends to be fairly divisive amongst fellow amputees.  Admittedly ITAP and similar implants are still currently available to only a small proportion of the amputee population that may benefit, but osseointegration is still a novel and somewhat experimental methodology which only by embracing will make more widely available.  My response to the qualified welcome that the article received was as follows:

“ITAP has been nothing short of a personal revolution, allowing me to experience a level of functionality that I never thought would be possible of an above-knee amputee using a prosthesis. I agreed to be interviewed in order to present a patient’s perspective of what my personal experience has led me to believe is a significant improvement in prosthetic technology. As a participant within the trial, I have only a limited understanding of the eligibility criteria that currently define who may benefit from ITAP, but I do believe that presently these are quite narrow. I do know that all of my fellow trial participants that I have met at hospital visits have experienced similar improvements in quality of life to myself. What I would like to hope for in the near future is that as experience with implant technology increases, the group of amputees that may benefit in a similar way to myself will expand to encompass the majority of those that would opt for a surgical option to improve their mobility. This evolution in technological application has recently been demonstrated in Australia where a below knee amputee has been a recipient of similar technology and was walking eight weeks post-op (more info can be found here: www.amputeeimplantdevices.com). I agree that the optimism with which this article should be greeted must be guarded, however, I do believe optimism that there is future hope for improved quality of life must surely be a good thing!”

 

This entry was posted in ITAP. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *